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There are many ways to add extra stitches into your knitting.  Make 1 increases are very popular for creating a mostly invisible increase between stitches in your fabric.  There is more than one way to describe how to make these increases, though they end up looking the same.  The difference in language can be confusing, so I made a little video to show the two “methods” side by side.

M1L: insert the left needle under the bar between the needles from the front, and knit into the back of it

IS THE SAME AS

M1L:  insert the right needle under the bar between the needles from the back and lift it onto the left needle so the right side is at the front, then knit into the back of it

AND

M1R: insert the left needle under the bar between the needles from the back and knit into the front of it

IS THE SAME AS

M1R: insert the right needle under the bar between the needles from the front, lift it over the left needle so the left side of it is in front, then knit into the front of it

Choose whichever language makes more sense to you!

[There’s a third option we could throw in there, which is the option I am using for my sweater.  Instead of picking up the strand between the stitches in the fabric, which can sometimes distort the stitch adjacent to it, I am making a yarn over.  Then, on the next row, I am twisting the yarn over in the same fashion as the make 1 L or make 1 R in the video.  It’s a very picky thing, and just a personal preference of mine to keep my stitches in line.]

Why do we bother with R and L?  These create mirrored increases!  In our Spring Knitalong sweater we are increasing on either side of the raglan line of our sleeve.  By doing one kind of increase on one side and the opposite on the other, we give our sweater a more professional look!

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